Archive | March 2012

THE WOODEN BOWL

I guarantee you will remember the tale of the Wooden Bowl tomorrow, a week from now, a month from now,  a year from now.

A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law, and four-yearold grandson.

The old man’s hands trembled, his eyesight was blurred, and his step faltered

The family ate together at the table. But the elderly grandfather’s shaky hands and

failing sight made eating difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon onto the floor.

When he grasped the glass, milk spilled on the tablecloth. 

The son and daughter-in-law became irritated with the mess. 

‘We must do something about father,’ said the son.

‘I’ve had enough of his spilled milk, noisy eating, and food on the floor.’ 

So the husband and wife set a small table in the corner.

There, Grandfather ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed dinner.

Since Grandfather had broken a dish or two, his food was served in a wooden bowl. 

When the family glanced in Grandfather’s direction, sometimes he had a tear in his eye as he sat alone.

Still, the only words the couple had for him were sharp admonitions when he dropped a fork or spilled food. 

The four-year-old watched it all in silence.

One evening before supper, the father noticed his son playing with wood scraps on the floor.

He asked the child sweetly, ‘What are you making?’ Just as sweetly, the boy responded,

‘Oh, I am making a little bowl for you and Mama to eat your food in when I grow up. 

‘ The four-year-old smiled and went back to work. 

The words so struck the parents so that they were speechless. Then tears started to stream down their cheeks. Though no word was spoken, both knew what must be done. 

That evening the husband took Grandfather’s hand and gently led him back to the family table.

For the remainder of his days he ate every meal with the family. And for some reason,

neither husband nor wife seemed to care any longer when a fork was dropped, milk spilled, or the tablecloth soiled. 

On a positive note, I’ve learned that, no matter what happens, how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. 

I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles four things:

a rainy day, the elderly, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights. 

 

I’ve learned that making a ‘living’ is not the same thing as making a ‘life..’ 

I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance. 

I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands.You need to be able to throw something back sometimes<wbr>.</wbr>

I’ve learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you

But, if you focus on your family, your friends, the needs of others,

your work and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you 

I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision. 

I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one. 

I’ve learned that every day, you should reach out and touch someone. 

People love that human touch — holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back. 

I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn. 

 

~~anon

~jinjersam~

*credit to the owner/s..just sharing this email to everyone*

Advertisements

MY RESIGNATION

 

I am hereby officially tendering my resignation as an adult. I have decided I would like to accept the responsibilities of an 8 year-old.

I want to go to McDonald’s and think that it’s a four star restaurant. I want to sail sticks across a fresh mud puddle and make a sidewalk with rocks.

I want to think M&Ms are better than money because you can eat them. I want to lie under a big oak tree and run a lemonade stand with my friends on a hot summer’s day.

I want to return to a time when life was simple; When all you knew were colors, multiplication tables, and nursery rhymes, but that didn’t bother you, because you didn’t know what you didn’t know and you didn’t care.

All you knew was to be happy because you were blissfully unaware of all the things that should make you worried or upset. I want to think the world is fair. That everyone is honest and good.

I want to believe that anything is possible. I want to be oblivious to the complexities of life and be overly excited by the little things again. I want to live simple again. I don’t want my day to consist of computer crashes, mountains of paperwork, depressing news, how to survive more days in the month than there is money in the bank, doctor bills, gossip, illness, and loss of loved ones.

I want to believe in the power of smiles, hugs, a kind word, truth, justice, peace, dreams, the imagination, mankind, and making angels in the snow. So… here’s my checkbook and my car-keys, my credit card bills and my 401K statements. I am officially resigning from adulthood.

And if you want to discuss this further, you’ll have to catch me first, cause……..

 

……”Tag! You’re it.”

 

~~ anon

 

~jinjersam~

*credit to the owner/s.. just sharing this email to everyone*

 

 

ginger-snapped

this weekend, steve and i were fortunate enough to be able to visit two countries i never thought i’d get to see: sweden and denmark.

i did not bring warm enough clothes. but these countries are absolutely gorgeous, particularly the city of copenhagen, where we met up with a few of steve’s friends and got to view the city through a local’s eyes.

of course, on our way to copenhagen (taxi, plane, bus, train, metro, train), we stopped in the swedish city of malmo for lunch at a little place called victors, and had a chance to wander around a bit before our train to copenhagen arrived.

when we finally arrived in denmark, we were fortunate to be able to stay with two different and wonderfully kind couples, who showed us around the city, brought us to fabulous restaurants, and put up with my constant photo-taking.

copenhagen is beautiful. buildings…

View original post 601 more words

YOU ARE BIGGER THAN YOUR PROBLEMS

You Are Bigger Than Your Problems

Draw from God’s strength to overcome life’s challenges.

By Norman Vincent Peale

One of the great truths in life is that you are bigger than anything that can happen to you—as long as you know it and act accordingly. Every challenge and crisis that comes your way provides the opportunity for you to ask God to release the creative ingenuity, wisdom and strength that lie within you. The Psalmist knew this when he declared, “It is God who arms me with strength and keeps my way secure” (Psalm 18:32).

How do you tap into your inner strength? First, pray to God and place your entire situation in his hands. Say, “God, I commit my challenges to you. Show me the way through them. Give me eyes to see your solutions and strength to act on them.” God wants to help you solve your problems—and who could be a better counselor? “I am the LORD, the God of all mankind. Is anything too hard for me?” (Jeremiah 32:27). Next, sit down and lay out your entire problem, perhaps on a piece of paper. Sketch out possible solutions and pray over them, asking God to show you which one is right. When you feel you have an idea of how to proceed, move forward resolutely, praying all the time for the power to succeed. Affirm that you can do anything through the strength that Christ gives you (Philippians 4:13).

If doubts creep in, set them firmly aside with a quick prayer: “God, rid me of these fears and give me your strength.” God will answer that prayer, and, step by step, you will find yourself drawing upon an inner power you perhaps never knew you had. In Jeremiah 33:3, God promises, “Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.”

You can face your difficulties by the presence of Christ, for He is stronger than all of them; He is the antidote to discouragement and fear. Draw upon his power. Walk tall. Stand up to your situation!